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December 2014: Current Writing: 'Everything Must Change' Excerpt: Not Conscientious Objectors: 'The country is called to arms. The people rise against the evil foe! … Or do they? How does one communicate with an island population that is largely illiterate? … Where the majority speak little or no English? Place yourself in their position.

You are illiterate. You receive a letter delivered by a postman who has never before called at your cottage. Your cottage has no letterbox, so the overworked postman shoves this call-to-arms letter under the gap at the bottom of the door, a gap large enough to let snow in in winter, the rats whenever they choose. You later pick up the envelope and find that blotter-like, it has absorbed the damp from your earthen floor. There’s some writing on the envelope but it’s all meaningless to you. You turn it over. You even sniff at it but are none the wiser for your effort. It’s choosing time: you can dry this thing out perhaps then use it to light your stick fire next morning? Or you could take it to John Railway and find out what it’s all about. You choose the latter. John tells you that the letter instructs you to report to a particular place, at a particular time so that you may be medically assessed prior to being drafted into a branch of the armed forces. Armed forces? Pull the other one John! What is it? What is it, really? It’s from the council, isn’t it? Despite John’s serious expression you still hope. This has got to be a mistake John; surely? … …

Ok John; you’ll admit that though you’ve never been one go to church – not regular-like, though your heart’s in the right place … and, and you’ve never had trouble with the law so it must be a mistake. They must know you’re needed to help with the hay-making at Ted Rowlands’s place next week? And your Megan is expecting her sixth next month. Tell them John. Tell them you’ve never been on one of those train things … never even crossed that dangerous bridge to the mainland … and then there’s the way they speak John – you can’t speak two spokes … You thought John knew that? So you wouldn’t understand what they’re saying … And they wouldn’t understand what you are saying. So you’d be no good to them … no good at all. Tell them all this John … that all this palaver is making your bloody blood boil. See John? See? All this mucking about has started you swearing like a trooper now. You’re not bloody going and there’s an end to it. Tell them that John. Tell them that from you'.  

December 2014: Excerpt from the Introduction of my Current Writing - Everything Must Change: 'The Second World War found the Isle of Anglesey. It found it for strategic purposes. It found an island where 20% of the population was dependent upon assistance by the parish. It found living conditions that had only a few years previously been described by the secretary of the Welsh Housing Association as being in many ways worse than the slums of Canton in China. Despite the efforts of the so-called schools, very few people spoke or understood English. If my father spoke Welsh in school he would be punished by having a heavy slate hung round his neck that read: ‘I must not speak Welsh in school’. But he couldn’t read it and neither could anyone else, so they lost only their dignity … Clean drinking water was scarce. Water was pumped from the mainland to some areas of the island by pipe over the two bridges. Most roads were little more than cart tracks. Tuberculosis was rife. In 1938 the country had 700 TB hospitals. The local children’s TB hospital was only a mile from our home. While holding our breaths as we walked quickly by, we would wave to the mostly dying children, outside the building in their beds, and only when we’d walked safely past would we continue our normal breathing again. Before I was born even, my home, a one-up two-down with an Asbestos lean-to – a place without water, sanitation, electricity; a place with an uneven packed-earth floor, was unsurprisingly ‘Condemned’ as being unfit for human habitation. But no one ever did anything because there was nowhere else to go. Those fortunate enough to be employed worked for 15/= (75p) per week. This is the island the Second World War found. This is the island the Second World War liberated from its squalor and thereby brought forward to the 20th Century'. 

April 2013

 

1: My Fiction eBooks – first published on amazon, are now also available from www.smashwords.com

While amazon eBooks get to Kindle, iPad, iPod, iPhones, PC, Mac, Blackberry, and Android phones, Smashwords books, in addition to being sold at www.smashwords.com are also distributed to major eBook retailers such as the Apple iPad, iBooks, Nook, Barnes and Noble, Sony Reader, Kobo, the Diesel eBookstore and most e-reading apps including Stanza, Aldiko, Adobe Digital Editions etc.

 

'Let’s Play Pretend'

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/280088

 

'Brief Encounters'

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/280217

 

'Telling Silences'

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/280223

 

Geraint Ellis/smashwords author profile

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/nain9

 

June 2013 

2: My first NON- FICTION eBook, 'Trumpet Style in Jazz' is now published by amazon AND Smashords.com 

(Face to face interviews between myself and world-renowned trumpet players of the 70’s and 80’s)

Interviews with:

Jimmy McPartland - Wild Bill Davison - Dizzy Gillespie - Clark Terry - Ruby BraffBilly Butterfield - Kenny Baker - Thad Jones - Howard McGhee - Harry ‘Sweets’ Edison - Henry Lowther - plus Ken Rattenbury, author of ‘Duke Ellington, Jazz Composer’ and Bill Dean Myatt, co-author of Bix, Man and Legend  - plus ‘Jazz Trumpet Transcriptions’ – plus ‘Film Footage: Audio-Visual Links’ to performances by these players at that time.

 

'Trumpet Style in Jazz':

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Trumpet-Style-in-Jazz-ebook/dp/B00CID0EQW/ref=pd_rhf_ee_p_img_3_GDKG

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/324896 

Geraint Ellis/amazon author profile

http://www.amazon.com/author/geraintellis

 

 

See my website with one-click access to my books @

www.geraintellis.com

Follow me on Twitter @ellis_geraint